Launched a new game: Cr1ckt

Direct link to game: https://sinisterstuf.itch.io/cr1ckt

On the 1st of December Tristan, Rowan and I released the first version of Cr1ckt, a tricky platformer where you need to jump to avoid water and get to the fruit. It’s our submission for the GitHub Game Off 2021 game jam, an annual challenge to make a game based on a secret theme within the month of November. The theme this year is “BUG” so apart from playing as a cricket it also has some fun, intentional bugs.

It’s got downloads for major desktop platforms Windows, Linux & Mac, as well as Android. They’re quite small so you should be able to download and play quite fast. You can get the downloads or play online in your browser on the game page at sinisterstuf.itch.io/cr1ckt.

As hobbyist game developers in our free time this is one of the most complex games we’ve made so far. We spent a lot of evenings together during November, designing, programming, drawing, testing and also ideating on creative “bugs” to keep the game challenging but not impossible. Give it a go and let us know what you think!

One of the requirements for the jam is that the source code be shared publicly on GitHub, so you can find the game’s source code, levels and media along with instructions on how to build and run it yourself at github.com/sinisterstuf/cr1ckt. Cr1ckt is written in Go using the Ebiten library. I write detailed commit messages so if there’s anything surprising in the code, you’ll find the explanation for it in the history. You can see visual updates of the game during its development tagged with #cr1ck_t on Twitter.

This is my third year participating in this game jam. You can find previous game submissions if you browse on to my itch.io profile from the game links above.

3D-printed caps for protruding bolts

When I attached our children’s swing to the ground there was still a significant piece of sharp-ish threaded metal sticking out above the bolt head and I was worried about them falling on it. Grinding the end off might still leave some sharp parts, so I thought it safer to print plastic covers for them.

I designed the caps with OpenSCAD, using the ScrewsMetric library for the bolt-shaped inset.

You can see the source code for the design in this GitHub gist:

include <ScrewsMetric/ScrewsMetric.scad>;

$fn = 30;
GHOST = false;
outer_size = 40;

difference() {
    sphere(d = outer_size);
    translate([-outer_size/2,-outer_size/2,0]) cube(outer_size);
    translate([-outer_size/2,11,-outer_size+1]) cube(outer_size); // cut
    rotate([0,0,30]) translate([0,0,0.002]) BoltNormalWithSurface(hexHeadBolt, M12, 15+0.002);
}

The biggest challenge was to find an acceptable compromise in shape and size:

  • tall enough to cover the top of the bolt
  • narrow enough base to fit next to the swing’s leg
  • should be printable without overhangs and no need for supports

The final design I went with is a bit different from in the photo above because that one didn’t fit. I kept the size the same and chopped off one side of the dome to leave space for the swing’s leg.

You can download the generated STL files for printing from the Thingiverse website.

It printed really well and I stuck the pieces in place with some leftover silicone.