3D Printed Hungarian Cross

The Hungarian coat of arms features an iconic cross with two horizontal beams. In Hungarian it’s called “Kettős Kereszt” which translates to “Double Cross”, usually called the Patriarchal cross in English. This cross is present on other emblems around the area of Central and Eastern Europe too and has been featured on the Hungarian coat of arms at least since the reign of King Saint Stephen of Hungary.

3D model of the patriarchal cross as shown on the Hungarian coat of arms

3D model of the patriarchal cross as shown on the Hungarian coat of arms

Seeing as it’s a Hungarian national holiday today, in memory of the heroes and martyrs of the Hungarian revolution of 1956, everyone has their Hungarian flags out. I decided to do something Hungarian too, while trying out some tools for preparing models for 3D printing. So far I’ve been using Blender, because I have some experience with it, but it’s for creating 3D scenes and although you can use it to design 3D models for printing, it’s not CAD software. This time I tried Autodesk’s web-based program Tinkercad, which although lacking many of the features you’d get in a full-blown CAD program, is plenty enough for me to design simple things like this. Not being a mechanical engineer, I probably wouldn’t even know what features I’m missing!

photo collage of 3D printed "Kettős Kereszt" painted in the colours of the Hungarian flag

3D printed “Kettős Kereszt” painted in the colours of the Hungarian flag

The program is very intuitive to use. I put a few cubes on the workplane, stretched them out into intersecting rectangular boxes and exported an STL file for printing within minutes. You can see a screenshot of the result above. I also made a version with a hole cut out of the top so you could hang it on a key chain. That turned out to be as easy as putting a cylinder in one of the boxes, stretching it out of the top and bottom box faces and marking it as a “hole” in the model.

After scaling the model down to 30% so it fits on my print bed, the final print came out as shown in this photo. It took less than 10 minutes to print at 30% in-fill and seems pretty rigid. I’ve painted on the red, white and green of the Hungarian flag and will hang this up somewhere, who knows, maybe it’ll even be good for a Christmas decoration. If you’d like to print your own Hungarian cross you can download both of my STL files here:

In honour of the heroes! Tisztelet a hősöknek!

Várkért Bazár

Last month we went to see the recently renovated Várkert Bazár –literally “Castle Gardens Bazaar”— in Budapest’s castle district, here are some photos.

Cat vs Crow

Very strange. On Thursday, on my way to work I saw a cat in the park being harassed by a crow so I recorded it. Unfortunately the video isn’t very sharp because the animals were far away and I was recording them with my phone. I thought it was really funny, as if the crow had a big problem with the cat being there, meanwhile the cat completely ignores the bird.

Funniest of all, I walked the same route the next day and they were there again doing the exact same thing!

Wood Chopping

Last weekend we went to visit Berni’s family in Vaszar and we chopped wood for the winter. The logs were really big, so we used a hydraulic wood splitter like this one. It was still a lot of work moving the heavy logs onto the splitter and carrying and stacking the split wood into piles, and I’m told that the next step will be to axe those into smaller pieces that can be used to heat the house in winter.

Unfortunately nobody thought to take any pictures of us in action, but these two large piles were the result of our day’s work:

A large pile of wood we chopped

A large pile of wood we chopped

Another pile of wood behind the first one

Another pile of wood behind the first one

I think I might write more often about the fun stuff that happens when we go to visit in Vaszar.